In order for your interview to be posted on Magazine/News Placement Sites, kindly answer the mandatory questions listed below. We would also suggest answering the “Recommended” ones though. Please understand the more questions you answer, the better your interview will look. If you want your business to be successful, you will have to be prepared to be interviewed by serious newspapers and magazines. So consider this as a Media training exercise. The list of questions we are asking are the ones most Public Relations company uses to prepare you before scheduling an interview.

Please try and be honest and avoid “cliché” answers.

Also, make sure to send in a high resolution photo (preferably headshot) with this interview. If you can send additional photos (of your company) it will help. You can also send a video of your company with the interview. Please understand that the more information you send, the better your interview will stand out from others.

Please note we reserve the final right on selecting which answers to publish as well as story angles to use. If you want to preview the interview before we post it, kindly let us know.

Mandatory Questions –

  • Kindly give our readers an introduction to your business. Please include what your business is all about, in which city you are located and if you have offices in multiple locations/ cities.
    • Favero Chiropractic is a modern clinic located in North Ogden, Utah ready to help you and your family feel better. We work with the young and old, infants and pregnant women, athletes, “weekend warriors”, and those suffering from neck pain, back pain, sciatica, vertigo, and migraines. We treat the spine, conditions in the arms and legs, and have specific procedures to help with sinus and ear problems. Our clinic also specializes in work injuries and auto accidents (personal injury claims).
    • We offer emergency and after hour treatment (including Saturday, Sunday, holidays, weekends, and late nights by appointment).
  • Kindly give us a brief description about yourself (it should include your brief educational or entrepreneurial background and list some of your major achievements).
    • People look for a lot of things in a chiropractor: a doctor, a good listener, a source of information, or maybe just a good back cracker. I hope to be this and more for you and your family. I am a straightforward doctor. Having practiced in several clinics and most recently on the tough miners and oil field workers of Wyoming the last 3 years, I want to say I can treat most everything and can get you moving like you need.
    • But my main focus is the wellness of my patients.
    • There is something powerful about discovering what is causing your symptoms and knowing there is something that can aid your body in fixing that problem. There is also power in finding the right tool to bring you to the next level in your health, moving up from doing “pretty good” to feeling whole or truly “well”.
    • Dr. Jeff Favero is originally from Ogden, Utah though he has also lived in Salt Lake City, Portland, Southeast Asia, and the wild frontier of Wyoming. He was proud to attend Weber State University and achieved his doctorate degree in chiropractic at the University of Western States.
  • What inspired you to (start a new business venture) or (to make significant changes in an existing business)? How did the idea for your business come about?
    • I have worked in several clinics and felt it was time to return to my native Utah and start a clinic here! There is nothing like the Wasatch Front and I am excited to be back here hiking and playing and providing the highest quality of care to the families of the greater Ogden area. I had great opportunities and gained clinical experience as a chiropractor in other locations, but have always wanted to run my own clinic. It is phenomenal combining all the methods of treatment I have learned and applying them to every appointment with my patients.
  • What three pieces of advice would you give to budding entrepreneurs?
    • Save ahead so you are financially prepared for the leap into a new business venture. Speak with colleagues in your field of expertise, especially those around the location you plan to start your business. Be involved in your community and support the local businesses.
  • What would you say are the top three skills needed to be a successful entrepreneur?
    • Knowing the value of your services and how to translate that into a benefit to your customers, keeping up to date in your professional field, and having honesty and integrity in all your dealings.
  • How many hours do you work a day on average?
    • 8-10 hours, which mostly consists of patient care but also involves the marketing, accounting, and general flow of the office.
  • To what do you most attribute your success?
    • That I care deeply for my patients and will do everything to help them achieve and maintain wellness.
  • How do you go about marketing your business? What has been your most successful form of marketing?
    • I have done some printed ads and a fair amount of online advertising, but my most successful form of marketing has been through my current patients. They have been to the clinic and experienced the quality of care here. They know how much we want to help them and their family and then they tell their friends and colleagues about us.
  • Where did your organizations funding/capital come from and how did you go about getting it? How did you obtain investors for your venture?
    • I had been saving up for some time in hopes that I would be ready to start a business of my own. In the end, I required additional funding for equipment and was able to procure funds through a company with which I had already worked.
  • What is the best way to achieve long-term success?
    • Put down roots in your community and show them you are there for good. Be honest and kind in your business interactions, erring on the side of generosity.
  • Where you see yourself and your business in 5 – 10 years?
    • I see my company as a vital part of the Utah community and myself as an approachable small business owner in the neighborhood. I hope to be the doctor you bring your children to when they are busy with sports or experiencing growing pains. My clinic will be the place all ages come for chiropractic care and return for preventative and wellness care.
  • Excluding yours, what company or business do you admire the most?
    • I most admire my father’s photography business: Jeffrey Favero Photography. He was a dentist for all my childhood and recently decided to sell his business and pursue his passion for photography. He is here in Ogden and has a beautiful gallery as well as artwork at local businesses and public venues. I respect his choice to follow a dream and am inspired by the directions it has taken him.

Recommended Questions –

  • How important have good employees been to your success?
    • Having the right employees, good employees that work together well and are happy being in our office, has been crucial to the success of our clinic. There is power in a smiling face to welcome my customers. In chiropractic, patients will return for regular care and so see the staff quite regularly. It is helpful when the staff makes the experience pleasant and memorable.
  • How long do you stick with an idea before giving up?
    • I usually don’t want to let something go until I can solve it. It is part of being a perfectionist. I will give it my full attention until it gets done. Setting up our second website took me 2-3 weeks of every-waking-moment attention. So I have a hard time giving up on an idea. It is something I need to do better at – to realize when it is time to throw in the towel and move onto something else.
  • What motivates you?
    • Knowing the reasoning behind a task. When I have something due by a certain date but don’t really understand what it is for, then I might wait until the day before it is due. But when I know advertising online will take a big hit because something is wrong with my website, then I will work relentlessly until it is fixed. I understand why the task needs to be done.
  • What are your ideals?
    • Work with honesty and integrity. Be generous and kind and approachable. I try my best to do these and when someone thanks me or smiles then I know it is working.
  • How do you generate new ideas?
    • When I need to come up with something creative I will first think about it when walking between home and the clinic. Then I’ll sit with a notepad or a word document on the computer and start outlining what it is I need. When I begin with the goal in mind, it somehow helps me start formulating solutions. Then I will start writing whatever comes into my head. The ultimate help is running it past my wife or someone with business experience and listening with an open mind.
  • How do you define success?
    • I believe success is more than just being busy or getting better income. Success is making a difference in someone’s life, however small that difference may be. I can see that difference when a person is happier and healthier. I can see it when my patients tell their friends and family about what I do and how it helped them.
  • How do you build a successful customer base?
    • One patient at a time. With each new person that experiences what Favero Chiropractic has to offer comes another cheerleader for my business. I especially want to increase my returning customers. This happens as those patients progress to healthier lives and they are returning to my clinic every 1-2 months for wellness care.
  • What is your favorite aspect of being an entrepreneur?
    • Running the business the way I think will work best. I can try something new and though it may fail it was worth it because I learned through that experience. When I can proceed with a different idea it may be risky but that is often how the best results come about.
  • What has been your most satisfying moment in business?
    • When a new customer walks in the door and says they heard good things about me or my business. As long as that keeps happening I know everything will work out. With chiropractic we often see dramatic results to pains that people think are a normal part of life: headaches, back pain, sciatica, ear infections. It is a satisfying profession because results are often quite immediate and my patients express relief right in the clinic after their treatment.
  • What do you feel is the major difference between entrepreneurs and those who work for someone else?
    • Just personal preferences and the fields in which they work. Some professions just don’t have as many opportunities for entrepreneurism and work best as being an employee. Since my father ran his own dental practice he was able to schedule time away with his family. This was important to me so I always sought to have my own business. It began as dentistry but morphed over time into becoming a different kind of doctor – a chiropractor. I can see the advantage of working for someone else because there is a stability there – steady paycheck, more regular hours, health benefits. None of these are guaranteed when you are the owner. Yet in the best of times, a business owner can more easily carve out his or her own schedule and still maintain an acceptable paycheck. It just depends on what a person is looking for and what options their profession has.
  • What kind of culture exists in your organization? How did you establish this tone and why did you institute this particular type of culture?
    • At my chiropractic clinic there is a modern feeling of a place that is up to date and capable of handling a broad scope of conditions. But I also foster a comfortable, welcoming culture that allows patients to feel at home and understand they are important and valued.
  • In one word, characterize your life as an entrepreneur.
    • Potential. I feel I have done a lot to get here, but that I am just beginning. The potential ahead as a doctor in Utah is what thrills me and gets me through the tough times.

Optional Questions –

  • If you had the chance to start your career over again, what would you do differently?
    • I would probably work in more medical related jobs during my undergraduate studies. I was able to work for a chiropractor before going to chiropractic college and it opened my eyes to my future. Customer service, accounting, and office manager jobs did help me grow but I do think working in the medical field could have jump started my career in a special way.
  • How has being an entrepreneur affected your family life?
    • There are times when I struggle to have the time I want for my family, but these are not often because of my values. I simply will not allow the business to be my number one priority. My family understands that there are times when I need to get to the clinic for an emergency chiropractic patient or stay late for paperwork. But I try to not make a habit out of it. It is a constant struggle to keep my priorities in line, but definitely worth it.
  • What is your greatest fear, and how do you manage fear?
    • That someone will be unhappy with my services. It happens in all businesses and I know that not everyone will be pleased with everything about our clinic. It is just the way it is. But I still fear it at times. So I manage those moments by remembering that I did my very best for that person. As long as I did everything I could to help them and I trained my staff to do their best then I can sleep easy. Not all customers will be satisfied, but at least I know we did all we could to help them and hope they will find what they need somewhere else.
  • How did you decide on the location for your business?
    • I grew up in Ogden, Utah and have always loved the area. I started there in my search and then began looking at nearby towns until I found a spot that felt right. It wasn’t all based on “feelings” though. I found an area with a good population and a healthy median household income. I decided on a place with good schools and multiple resources. North Ogden is a beautiful area and I knew I would be happy here. I think more people are seeing the value of chiropractic care, so now I just want people to learn who I am and see the value of care I provide.
  • Do you believe there is some sort of pattern or formula to becoming a successful entrepreneur?
    • Probably, and I would love to know it! In all seriousness I feel an entrepreneur will find a way to be successful if they are willing to keep working and thinking and struggling until they find the right fit for them and their business. It can take time but is worth it in the end. So be determined and positive and honest and you will see results.
  • Who has been your greatest inspiration?
    • My father and mother. They have both started new businesses in the last few years and are such great examples. They found something they loved doing and figured out a way to run a business with it. It also helps that I love them and everything they do.
  • What book has inspired you the most? (OR what is your favorite book?)
    • Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers by Robert Sapolsky really helped me understand the purpose of stress in my life and also the damage it can do if not controlled. Stress is normal and a good motivator, but when it is too strong and too constant it can affect our mind-body balance and really mess with our health.
  • What are some of the biggest mistakes you’ve made?
    • I overestimated the patients I could gain from my first public advertising and it was a big downer when it didn’t work. I put up a booth at a local festival and thought I would draw in a bunch of new customers. We had a few but nothing like I had planned. It made me realize that I could have done it better and that it is could to use multiple avenues of marketing to gather new clients.
  • How can you prevent mistakes or do damage control?
    • By running your ideas by someone with business experience, especially if they have a history in your own field of expertise. Their advice can be invaluable. Sometimes it may just confirm that you are making a good decision, and that is extremely helpful too.
  • What are your hobbies? What do you do in your non-work time?
    • I like getting out and taking in my surroundings. This can be as simple as a walk around the neighborhood, but when I have more time I like to go hiking. Such beautiful views among these Rocky Mountains! Utah is a fun place and there is always something entertaining to do. Of course it is nice now and again to see a new movie or go out for a fancy meal.
  • What makes you happy?
    • Other people. How can I be happy on my own? It just doesn’t work. I have come to realize how perfect my profession is for my personality. Interacting with my patients is a blast and it really fills my day with meaning. Seeing other people smile and hearing them laugh always brightens my mood. I enjoy catching up with people I haven’t seen for a while and spending time with my family.
  • What sacrifices have you had to make to be a successful entrepreneur?
    • Businesses can have fluctuation, with times of “feast or famine”. An entrepreneur has to prepare for these famine moments (which can be days or weeks) by saving up and having a budget. This has been a sacrifice for me, but it is a better solution than starving during those hard times. It can be difficult to decide a budget but invariably tougher to actually follow it. This applies to the business and to personal expenses. Budgeting money will allow for stability during the ebbs and flows of financial currents but budgeting time is just as important. I have had to sacrifice my personal time to make my business run properly and if I didn’t plan some breaks for myself it could have become much too overwhelming.

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